Opportunity and chance, contd.

From the position in the last post, after 1…. Qg3+!! 2. Kh1, Black could have won by 2… e3!!.

The immediate threat, which is enough to account for White’s tries 3. Be2 and 3. Ra3, is 3… Qh3+ 4. Kg1 Rxf2 5. Rxf2 exf2 mate. On the other hand 3. f3 is met by 3… Qh3+ 4. Kg1 Rxg4+! 5. fxg4 Rxf1 mate.

The toughest defence is 3. Ra7 (threatening mate), when Black wins via 3… Qh3+ 4. Kg1 exf2+ 5. Rxf2 Qg3+! 6. Rg2 (6. Kh1 Qh4+) 6… Rf1 mate.

[Click to replay.]

For the chess history questions, the event was the Irish Open Tournament 1964. This was held in conjunction with the Irish championship, at Newman House, St. Stephen’s Green, from July 11-18 (or -19), 1964. Despite the name, therefore, it seems much closer to a modern Irish championship weekender than to other Irish Opens.

The event resulted in a resounding victory for R. H. W. Polly (Lincolnshire) on 7½/8. Equal second, on 6/8, were the contestants in this game, Eamon Keogh and Keith M. Oliff (Essex), BCF Under 18 champion in 1959.

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